Shelf Sea Oceanography and

Meteorology research group *

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On-going and recent research projects   

 

Title

Project PI/Co-PI

Duration

Source

Research Projects - Active




Southern European Seas  Assessing and Modelling Ecosystem changes (SESAME)

G.Shapiro

2007-2010

EU-FP6

Black Sea Recovery as a Basis of Regional Environmental Security, Collaborative Research project

G.Shapiro

2006-2008

NUKR.CLG.
982285

Modelling of the Wyville Thomson Ridge overflow

V. Vlasenko
N.Stashchuk

2008-2011

NERC

Nontraditional baroclinic wave effects in the Strait of Gibraltar

V. Vlasenko
N.Stashchuk

2008-2009

NERC NE/F010214/1

A new mechanism for generation of internal wave

V. Vlasenko
N.Stashchuk

2007-2008

NERC NE/E01030X/1

Wave Hub Impacts on Seabed & Shoreline Processes (WHISSP)

 P. Hosegood
A.Nimmo-Smith
D. Huntley

2007-2010

SWRDA
PRIMaRE

The application of remote sensing to the measurement of marine particle size and their relation to turbulence

A.Nimmo-Smith

2007-2010

NERC
NE/EO15247/1

Mixing and Dispersion of Coastal Plumes

D. Huntley

2007-2009

UoP / BRNC

Wave-flow interactions

D.G.Dritschel /
V.I. Vlasenko, et al

2008-2011

EPSRC





Research Projects - Completed




Black Sea Ecosystem Recovery Project, United Nations Development Programme

L.Mee,
G.Shapiro

2004-2007

UN DP

INTAS Nordic Seas in the global climate system

G.Shapiro

2004-2007

INTAS

Boiling water in the Strait of Gibraltar

V. Vlasenko
N.Stashchuk

2006-2007

NERC
NE/D007968/1

Floating classroom for Meteorology and Oceanography

L.Wood
S.Bennetts

2005


Strongly nonlinear internal waves in lakes: generation, transformation and meromixis

V. Vlasenko

2004-2007

 INTAS  03-51-3728

Stratified flow in jet-type estuaries and fjords

V. Vlasenko

2004-2006

 NERC NEC50747X/1

Finite Element Modelling of the Hydrodynamics and Water Quality of the Patos Lagoon System, Brazil

D.Tyrrell
 K.George

2004

HR
FURG

Mass transfer through the submarine canyons canyons

G.Shapiro

2002-2005

INTAS
01-0460

Dense water overflows off continental shelves (cascading) 

G.Shapiro

2000-2003

INTAS
99-1600

Morphodynamics (Teignmouth & Humber) 

K.Dyer



Cycles in estuarine hydrodynamics in relation to cycles in near-bed flocculating suspensions

K.Dyer


NERC

Recent/current climate of Greenland and relation with Ice Sheet mass balance 

E.Hanna

2000-2003

NERC
GR3/11186

Comparative analysis of Water Mass Distribution and Circulation in semi-enclosed seas (White Sea & Irish Sea)

G.Shapiro

2000-2003

HEFCE

Acoustic noise generated by breaking waves in surf conditions (NFA)

S.Bass


Nuffield Foundation 

Meso-scale physical and biogeochemical processes in coastal waters of the Russian Arctic

 G.Shapiro

1998-2001

 INTAS
97-1881

Sand and mud dynamics in shelf seas

S.Bass

1997

SEFAS





Created by Laurent Latché  (2000) and maintained by Deborah Tyrrell (2003). Rebuild by Dr Dmitry Aleynik (2004) last update 18 January 2008


 

http://www.research.plymouth.ac.uk/shelf/image/butt.gifMeso-scale physical and biogeochemical processes in coastal waters of the    Russian Arctic, EU project INTAS-97-1881 (1998-2001)

Partners:

Objectives:

The project aims are to identify and quantify meso-scale physical and biogeochemical processes in the coastal waters of the White Sea and the Barents Sea and to assess the environmental impact of these processes. The main specific objectives are to:

TopFor more information about this project click hereRusArctic.html


http://www.research.plymouth.ac.uk/shelf/image/butt.gifDense water overflows off continental shelves (cascading),

EU project INTAS-99-1600 (2000-2003)

Partners:

Objectives:

Top  For more information about this project click hereCascading.html


http://www.research.plymouth.ac.uk/shelf/image/butt.gifMorphodynamics of Estuarine Systems in the United Kingdom: Teignmouth and Humber

Partners:

Objectives:

The management of estuaries requires a good understanding of their multiple uses and complex processes which are intrinsically related. The main objectives of this project are to provide a better comprehension of the mechanisms involved in the morphodynamic evolution of estuaries, and to address the problems that arise when controlling these systems. This kind of approach has a general application and constitutes the state of the art in the management of estuaries all over the world. In order to achieve these objectives and to test two real data sets, Teignmouth (South Devon) and the Humber Estuary (Yorkshire), both in UK which were chosen as case studies, due to the extensive information available for these sites. TELEMAC numerical model was selected to simulate the morphodynamic processes inherent to these environments.

TopFor more information about this project click hereMorphodyn.html


http://www.research.plymouth.ac.uk/shelf/image/butt.gifRecent/current climate of Greenland and relation with Ice Sheet mass balance

Collaborators:

Objectives:

Relating recent/ongoing changes in ice and climate in Greenland to improve understanding of present-day surface mass balance of Greenland Ice Sheet and its likely response to future sea-level change.

TopFor more information about this project click hereGreenland.html


http://www.research.plymouth.ac.uk/shelf/image/butt.gifComparative analysis of Water Mass Distribution and Circulation in semi-enclosed seas (White Sea & Irish Sea).

Partner:

Collaborators:

Objectives:

The aim of the project is to get a better  knowledge of the mesoscale water mass structure of the White Sea.  Specific objectives are to  study fine thermohaline structure, mixing of water masses and tidal stirring in the Northen part of the White Sea.  The project will contrast and compare hydrology of two semi-enclosed seas: the White Sea and the Irish Sea.

TopFor more information about this project click hereWhite_sea.html


http://www.research.plymouth.ac.uk/shelf/image/butt.gifMass transfer through the submarine canyons. EU project INTAS 01-0460 (2002-2005)

Partners:


Objectives:

The main goal of the project is to provide a deeper understanding of physical mechanisms that control the hydrodynamic regimes associated with submarine canyons and to evaluate their impact on mass transfer between the continental shelf and open ocean.

TopFor more information about this project click hereCanyons.html


http://www.research.plymouth.ac.uk/shelf/image/butt.gif'The acoustic noise generated by breaking waves in surf conditions'. Funding body: Nuffield Foundation Award.

Synopsis:

Ambient noise generated by breaking waves provides information relating to the amount of energy that is lost in the breaking process. This energy is important in coastal seas because it generates turbulence and currents, suspends sediment and transports it along the coast. This work studies ambient noise in surf conditions by using an omnidirectional broad-band hydrophone to listen to the sound generated by waves breaking. Current and wave height information will be provided by current meters and pressure sensors respectively. The hydrophone data gives temporal information on the sound character of individual breakers and is compared with hydrodynamic and sediment concentration measurements. An over water video of the sea surface above the hydrophones will provide independent monitoring of wave breaking conditions.  
TopFor more information about this project click hereNoise.html


http://www.research.plymouth.ac.uk/shelf/image/butt.gif'Cycles in estuarine hydrodynamics in relation to cycles in near-bed flocculating suspensions'. Funding body: NERC.

Collaborator:

Synopsis:

Tidal cycles in turbulence, current velocity and salinity are compared with near-bed mud suspension characteristics through in-situ measurements of floc settling velocity, size and mass concentration. The complex nature of flocculating suspensions results in lags in the response of sediment properties to local forcing mechanisms which has important implications for residual flux magnitudes and directions. This study will examine the phase relationships between floc settling velocity, size and density, suspension concentration, turbulence and velocity in an estuarine environment and use the results to estimate transport and deposition rates as well as net fluxes over a tidal cycle.
 
TopFor more information about this project click hereCycles.html


http://www.research.plymouth.ac.uk/shelf/image/butt.gifOngoing research from PhD. "Sand and mud dynamics in shelf seas"

Partners:

Synopsis:

This ongoing collaboration involves analysis of sediment and hydrodynamic information acquired by the CEFAS minipods in an inner shelf environment at 5 different locations and over a period of 2 months in 1997.

TopFor more information about this project click hereCycles.html


http://www.research.plymouth.ac.uk/shelf/image/butt.gifFinite Element Modelling of the Hydrodynamics and Water Quality of the Patos Lagoon System, Brazil

Partners:

Objectives:

The aim of this research project is to simulate the physical processes of hydrodynamics, transport and dispersion, and water quality in the Patos Lagoon and Estuary system, Brazil, using and 2 dimensional finite element hydrodynamic and water quality model (TELEMAC-2D and WQFLOW-2D). It is intended to use the model as a predictive tool to aid the decision making process for the rehabilitation and management of degraded environments within the estuary. This study hopes to provide advancement in the knowledge of simulating a complex system for the purposes of practical management. Specific objectives are :

TopFor more information about this project click herePatos.html


http://www.research.plymouth.ac.uk/shelf/image/butt.gifBlack Sea Ecosystem Recovery Project, United Nations Development Programme

BSERP-3 Cruise Report

Cruise report


TopFor more information about this project click hereBlack_sea.html


http://www.research.plymouth.ac.uk/shelf/image/butt.gifMini-researchers (Meteorology and Oceanography)

 
Len Wood and Steve Bennetts - in conjunction with a partnership of schools called Leading Edge took part in a floating classroom for 60 students on Tuesday 12th July 2005.

Partners:

Objectives:

This innovative approach to learning means that students from four schools across Devon and Cornwall were invited to spend the day at the Mount Batten Centre in Plymouth. Groups of students from Tamarside and Callington Community Colleges and Looe and Liskeard Community Schools took turns to spend 2 hour sessions on a boat out in Plymouth Sound learning about meteorology, oceanography,  charts, angles and bearings. 

The students took on the role of mini-researchers measuring and comparing air temperature, windspeed, and water visibility in Plymouth Sound and the Tamar.

There was a benefit of immersion in a variety of teaching and learning styles for 15 students from each of the schools involved.
  Top For more information about this project click here Black_sea.html


diamondINTAS Nordic Sea in the global climate system

View the "Climate Shum" video

The video was developed with the sponsorship from the Centre for Sustainable Futures and Schumacher College and is intended to give a "simple" ( understandable to first year students and applicants) holistic presentation of a complex probelm of the role of negative feedbacks in climate change.

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http://www.research.plymouth.ac.uk/shelf/image/butt.gif 

NERC Grant Ref. NEC50747X/1
Stratified flow in jet-type estuaries and fjords
                                                                          
PI  Dr. V. Vlasenko       01.11.2004-30.04.2006
The goal of the project was to gain a greater insight into the processes relevant to nonlinear internal waves in stratified estuaries and fjords produced by an external tidal forcing in a jet-type fjordic system, and to quantify in detail the pathway of tidal energy transformation, from barotropic to baroclinic component and ultimately to mixing.
The research objectives of this work included:

The achievement of the project objectives has led to an understanding of the energy flow path from the barotropic tidal flux to internal waves, and then to shorter solitary waves and turbulence in ôjet-typeö fjordic systems, when generated baroclinic disturbances are effectively arrested by strong tidal currents.
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INTAS Grant Ref. Nr 03-51-3728 
Strongly nonlinear internal waves in lakes: generation, transformation and meromixis

PI  Dr. V. Vlasenko       01.04.2004-31.03.2007

The overall goals of the project were to acquire a better understanding of the dynamic and kinematic processes relevant to nonlinear internal waves in lakes, to quantify the physical processes controlling the transfer of energy within the internal wave field from large to small scales and to gain more knowledge on impact caused by wave mixing on the lake ecosystem.

The specific objectives of this work included:


The achievement of the main goal of the project gave the possibility to understand the energy cascading from the wind to the basin-scale internal waves, and then to shorter solitary waves and turbulence in the benthic boundary layer.
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NERC Grant Ref. NE/D007968/1
Boiling water in the Strait of Gibraltar   
                                                                               
PI  Dr. V. Vlasenko       01.04.2006-30.03.2007

The principal aim of the project was to gain a greater insight into the processes relevant to large-amplitude internal waves generated by barotropic tide in the Strait of Gibraltar and to quantify in detail the transformation of tidal energy, from barotropic to baroclinic component and ultimately to mixing. The processes to be studied were:

The specific objectives of this work included:

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NERC Grant Ref. NE/E01030X/1
A new mechanism for generation of internal waves  
                                         
PI Dr. V. Vlasenko        01.04.2007-30.03.2008

The overall goal of the project is to study a new mechanism of internal wave generation that may occur in river-plume areas at the transition of the head of surface gravity current from supercritical (in terms of the Froude number) to subcritical regime of evolution. Formulated as a hypothesis in the course of the analysis of recently taken satellite images and the data of in-situ observations, this mechanism requires further theoretical clarification and justification on the basis of hydrodynamic modelling.

The greater insight into the new mechanism of the generation of internal waves will be achieved in the framework of the following research activities:

·        analysis of published in-situ data and satellite images provided by the University of Hamburg (Germany);

·        numerical simulations of the plume dynamics based on a fine-resolution fully nonlinear non-hydrostatic numerical model;

·        comparison analysis of the remote sensing and in-situ data with the results of numerical runs.

As a result of the aforementioned activities, the conditions controlling formation of large-amplitude internal waves at the frontal side of the river plume will be identified and clarified in terms of various input parameters such as model geometry, river discharge, bottom topography, sea water stratification etc.

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NERC Grant Ref. NE/F010214/1
Nontraditional baroclinic wave effects in the Strait of Gibraltar  
                               
 PI  Dr. V. Vlasenko       01.04.2008-30.03.2009

The principal aim of the project is to study the three-dimensional evolution of packets of tidally generated large-amplitude internal waves in the Strait of Gibraltar. On the basis of this knowledge the pathway of energy in the wave packets (and the observed irregular structure of wave packets, in particular) will be explained and quantified. The greater insight into the baroclinic wave dynamics of the strait and, as a consequence, into the mixing processes initiated by the tidally generated internal waves will be achieved in the framework of the following research activities:

·        the oceanographic objective is to work with the experimental data collected by the University of Malaga (Spain) at two moorings during a three-month experiment in 2005 to quantify significant baroclinic wave events occurring in the strait;

·        the numerical objective is to apply the-state-of-the-art fully nonlinear non-hydrostatic MITgcm to the strait with the real bathimetry and to reproduce the evolution of tidally generated internal waves and their input into spatial-temporal variability in the strait with the focus on three-dimensional nonhydrostatic effects and mixing processes;

·        the comparison objective includes an accurate comparison analysis of the available in-situ data with the results of numerical modelling in order to quantify the nontraditional three-dimensional baroclinic wave processes occurring in the strait.


As a result of the aforementioned activities, the conditions controlling the evolution of large-amplitude internal waves in the strait will be identified and clarified
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NERC Grant Ref. NE/EO15247/1
The application of remote sensing to the measurement of marine particle size and their relation to turbulence
£307,434
In collaboration with Drs Bowers (PI) & Jago and Prof Simpson, University of Wales, Bangor
To provide high-quality in situ suspended particle size information using a submersible holographic particle imager
.
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Mixing and Dispersion of Coastal Plumes.  UoP / BRNC
D.Huntley

Partners:

2007-2009
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EPSRC network project
Wave-flow interactions

2008-2011

PI - D.G.Dritschel (University of St. Andrews), 
       V.I. Shrira (Keele University) ,
       J. Vanneste (Edinburgh University);

Co-PIs V.I. Vlasenko (Plymouth University),
             R.Grimshaw (Loughborough University ),
             M.E. McIntyire (Cambridge University)

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NERC Grant
Modelling of the Wyville Thomson Ridge overflow

01.04.2008-31.03.2011


     PI  Dr. V. Vlasenko     

Co-PI  Dr N Stashchuk
Amount Awarded     £136844
fEC                         £171054


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NATO Collaborative Linkage Grant SP.NUKR.CLG.982285
Black Sea Ecosystem Recovery is a Basis of Regional Environmental Security (2006-2009)

 

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS:
Prof Georgy Shapiro (University of Plymouth, UK)
Dr Evgeny Lemeshko (Marine Hydrophysical Institute, Ukraine)

 

The overall goal of the project is to reduce scientific uncertainties in the processes of mixing in the Black Sea and in particular related to the vertical mixing across the thermocline, and horizontal cross-frontal transport between the shelf and open sea regions induced by meso-scale dynamic. The project helps to reveal the pathways of pollutants based on the modern information from direct high-precision measurements of currents and remotely sensed data and obtain a better understanding of how these features influence losses/gains of pollutant/nutrients and hence the biological productivity and environmental stability of the Black Sea. This work is important for future management decisions affecting the Black Sea. The effective control of eutrophication requires major changes in land-based activities that should be advised by solid science. Present uncertainties regarding the behaviour of the system do not allow sufficiently precise modelling for new goals to be set. By reducing the uncertainties, the project will help to improve the environmental security and stability of the Black Sea.


Top For more information about this project click hereBlack Sea Ecosystem Recovery is a Basis of Regional Environmental Security


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Southern European Seas  Assessing and Modelling Ecosystem changes (SESAME) (2006-2010)

 

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR:
Prof Georgy Shapiro (University of Plymouth, UK)

The general scientific objectives of SESAME IP, supported by the European Commission, are to assess and predict changes in the Mediterranean and Black Sea ecosystems as well as changes in the ability of these ecosystems to provide goods and services.

The Mediterranean and Black Sea will be approached as a coupled climatic/ecosystem entity, with links and feedbacks to the world ocean. The assessment of ecosystem changes will be based on the identification of the major regime shifts in ecosystems that occurred during the last 50 years. Mathematical models, validated and upgraded using existing and new observations, will be used to predict ecosystem responses to changes in climate and anthropogenic forcings during the next five decades. The new data will be gathered during multidisciplinary, multiship oceanographic cruises in the Mediterranean and Black Sea. These will provide an overall picture of the Mediterranean and Black Sea that does not yet exist as well as essential datasets for model validation.


 


Top For more information about this project click hereBlack Sea Ecosystem Recovery is a Basis of Regional Environmental Security