Steve Rowland at the Cambrian Burgess Shale 9000ft in the Canadian Rockies, British Columbia, September 2002.

Research Interests

My major interests are in the areas of organic and environmental organic geochemistry, with particular emphasis in these areas:

  1. Origin and significance of highly branched acyclic isoprenoids
  2. Nature of unresolved complex mixtures of hydrocarbons
  3. Studies of organic pollutants
    1. Oil pollution
    2. Other hydrophobic pollutants

Origin and Significance of Highly Branched Acyclic Isoprenoids

The structural and stereochemical specificity conferred on many organic molecules during biosynthesis is preserved when the compounds are incorporated into sediments. Proof of the structures of such molecules (biological markers) has had such a dramatic impact on petroleum geochemistry that laboratories worldwide are now equipped with the analytical instrumentation necessary for monitoring changes in such compounds. Amongst the most valuable and widely used are a number of acyclic isoprenoid hydrocarbons.

Batch cultures of the diatom Haslea ostrearia
Cultures of the diatom Haslea ostrearia: producer of lipids useful to geochemistry and medicine!

The first synthesis and complete spectral characterisation (MS, 13C NMR) of a novel C25 isoprenoid alkane and related alkenes was reported by myself and John Robson in Nature and allowed the compounds reported, but not identified, in over fifty other studies to be assigned. Subsequently, C20 and C30 analogues were also synthesised and the synthetic compounds were used to afford a possible explanation of their sedimentary abundance and worldwide distribution. A number of incorrect assignments by US workers, were corrected. The research area increased further in importance to industry with the discovery of the diatom (algal) source of the compounds by Australian workers and their occurrence in Russian and Australian crude oils. Subsequent reports resulted in continued funding which on completion, led to a postdoctoral NERC ROPA award in collaboration with Professor Jean-Michel Robert at the Université de Nantes, France (report rated Scientifically Excellent by NERC reviewers 1999). Invited lectures in the U.S.A., Spain and Australia, followed by a sabbatical year at the CSIRO Marine Laboratories in Australia were accompanied by filing of two provisional patents and numerous publications, describing the uses of the alkenes as biomarkers and as potential anti-tumour agents (see WWW links) and we eventually identified virtually all of the common sedimentary compounds. Owing to their structural and stereochemical specificity, we postulated that these molecules were both potentially valuable diatom markers and that they might prove important to petroleum geochemistry and oceanography as 'biological markers' of algae. We collaborated in a study published in Science (304, 584-587, 2004; DOI) with scientists at the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ) and Stanford University, USA to use these compounds to calibrate the geological clock for the molecular evolution of Rhizosolenid diatoms and we discovered that one of these compounds (a monoene) is made exclusively by species of diatoms that live in sea-ice in both the Arctic and the Antarctic. Thus, the presence of the compound in ancient sediments (at least in the 10,000-year period of the Holocene) now aids the re-construction of the distribution and extent of palaeoice fronts, an important goal of climate research. We have published many papers in Antarctic Science, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Marine Chemistry Nature Communications and Organic Geochemistry, describing these findings. The resulting sea-ice proxies (IP25 and IPSO25) are widely used in palaeoclimate studies.

Nature of Unresolved Complex Mixtures of Hydrocarbons

GC×GC-ToF-MS instrument
GC×GC-ToF-MS instrumentation in our air-conditioned laboratories. Such equipment allows detailed characterisation of complex mixtures of environmental pollutants.

It is astounding, but nonetheless true, that until about 1990 even with sophisticated analytical tools then available, the hydrocarbon composition of the world's major energy source, namely crude oil was virtually unknown. Our report in Nature 1990 that a considerable proportion of these previously unresolved and unidentified hydrocarbons could be characterised by oxidative degradation was met with widespread interest (>150 citations to date). Synthesis, spectral characterisation and oxidation of some of the proposed hydrocarbons supported the conclusions of the initial studies, as did biological oxidation. Development of the methodology to include a quantitative, chemometrics-based analysis of the oxidation products also allowed the 'fingerprinting' of a variety of oils from oil spills and the method was applied to several unpublished oil spill incidents. The work attracted funding from British Petroleum and from the Natural Environment Research Council. The unraveling of crude oil composition has important consequences for both upstream and downstream petroleum industrial activities as well as for pollution studies. Significant in the latter respect is the increased toxicity of the UCM once oxidised. This realisation led to the funding of two further PhD studentships and two postdoctoral fellows by NERC, from which numerous publications resulted, including a paper delivered to the World Congress of the Society for Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) which won the Procter & Gamble Eurocor prize for the best lecture by a young scientist for PhD student Emma Smith and a paper published in Environmental Science and Technology, which was a "most cited" paper in 2007 (see publications). Steve won an Advanced Grant of €2M from the European Research Council to further this research in 2008 and this allowed us to purchase a state-of-the-art comprehensive two-dimensional GC-MS instrument with which we have resolved and identified even previously unresolved polar pollutants, such as naphthenic acids found in the oil sands of Canada and discharged from offshore oil platforms (please see 2011-2016 publications in Environmental Science & Technology and others).

Studies of Organic Pollutants

Oil Pollution

The off-shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon ablaze in the Gulf of Mexico
The off-shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon ablaze in the Gulf of Mexico (source).

Oil pollution remains a widespread environmental problem as emphasised by the 2010 Macondo Well spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Application of the analytical and biological marker chemistry expertise developed in the foregoing studies to the identification of crude oils spilled in the environment has proved an extremely environmentally valuable exercise over many years and has led to both published and consultancy studies. Differentiation of petroleum-derived and biogenic hydrocarbons in Mussels (Mytilus edulis) from North Sea oil platforms required a revision of previous estimates of pollutant burdens and one of the first identifications of a specific algal source for the biogenic compounds was made. Extension of this careful, compound-specific analytical approach proved valuable for the identification of Nigerian crude oil spilled into the Humber Estuary and of hydrocarbons from the Sullom Voe oil terminal. A fully funded studentship from Kuwait provided instrumentation necessary for a realistic appraisal of the role of solar radiation in the degradation of spilled oil. It is apparent that this process has not been adequately modelled by previous studies and our results indicate that if suitable attention is paid to experimental design, major differences in the degradation rates of oil-derived water-soluble aromatics are observed. The results of these initial studies were presented at an invited lecture to the British Association for the Advancement of Science (Mason lecture). Successive studies were supported by the University, NERC and Plymouth Marine Laboratory including further PhD studentships. An important development has been extension of this approach to an examination of the toxicological importance of the compounds from crude oil. This has revealed that previous research has under estimated a significant environmental burden. This work represents one of the few U.K. studies of molecular changes in spilled oil composition despite the regular occurrence of oil spills of headline proportions (e.g. Braer, Sea Empress). Our studies of the latter have resulted in numerous publications and both research council and industry funds. We are currently studying residues from the Torrey Canyon spill, which are now 50 years old.

Other hydrophobic pollutants

North Sea platform
Discharges of oil production chemicals add to the pollutant burden of the North Sea.

Industrial complexes are often situated on estuaries and use these water bodies as convenient discharge points for the dispersal of pollutants. However, many pollutants are hydrophobic and their transport paths are controlled by complex interactions. The fostering of relationships with Plymouth Marine Laboratory and the AstraZeneca Brixham Environmental Laboratory led to industrial support (postdoctoral fellowships and full-time and part-time PhD studentships) for studies into the behaviour and analysis of hydrophobic pollutants in aquatic systems. Our approach focussed on the interactions between hydrophobic pollutants produced by industry and natural humic substances in estuarine waters (the latter obtained in collaboration with Birmingham University). Work focused on the importance of using natural and hence representative humic substances to differentiate from the results of other studies, which used unrealistic commercial humics. Analytical methods developed included pyrolysis-GCMS and LC-MS-MS. Initial results with py-GCMS indicated major differences between humic substances coated onto estuarine particles collected from the Tees in summer compared to those collected in winter. However these results were not reproducible at low organic loadings. This has led us to turn to laboratory-based simulations of particle-organic interactions using 14C labelled pesticides as chemical probes. This approach led to the establishment of important physico-chemical partition data for a whole series of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) and importantly allowed an industrial problem relating to HOC desorption from soil to be solved. The skills developed led to a major contribution to the NERC LOIS programme based on an assessment of the budget of HOCs in the Humber estuary (see publications). Following successful completion of the LOIS study an application was made to the NERC MIME programme to extend our studies of the physico-chemical properties of HOCs, to chemicals discharged from oil platforms. The aim here was to combine the geochemistry with engineering models to produce a user-friendly management computer model from use of oil platforms. Some £296,000 of RC funds was granted to the Plymouth-led study (PI: S. Rowland) in June 1997 in two programmes of study. Industry contributions to the programme made total funding of this study >£1,000,000. The work was completed in January 2000. The data were incorporated into a detailed hydrological-geochemical-toxicological model (Proteus®) for management of oil platform discharges. Worldwide concern over the effects of estrogenic chemicals in the environment led to three studies funded by the Environment Agency and AstraZeneca, designed to examine the origins of such chemicals in sewage treatment works effluents. The results of these studies (Niven PhD, 2000) are now published (see publications).

Research Biography Teaching Publications Studentships Income Media WWW Presentations Top


Brief History

After ~35 years in organic geochemistry research, at 63 I am currently Professor of Organic Geochemistry, head of the Petroleum and Environmental Geochemistry Group and co-Director of the Biogeochemistry Research Centre at the University of Plymouth. In that time I have published over 200 papers and supervised over 35 PhD students. I have obtained many research grants and carried out a considerable amount of commissioned work for external agencies.

I was an undergraduate at the University of Bristol and returned there as a postgraduate following 2 years industrial experience. After completing my PhD under the supervision of Professor James Maxwell FRS, I undertook postdoctoral research with Professor Bob Alexander at Curtin University, Western Australia and then as a British Petroleum fellow at the University of Newcastle with the late Dr Archie Douglas. I was appointed to a lectureship at Plymouth in 1984, a Readership in 1989 and awarded a personal chair in 1993.

I was a member of the MRC Institute of Environment and Health working group on Estrogenic Chemicals in the Environment in 1996 and a Visiting Professor at the CSIRO Marine Laboratory in Hobart, Tasmania in 1997/8, sponsored by The Royal Society and British Council. From 1996 to 2004, I was an Associate Editor of the leading Elsevier international organic geochemistry journal, Organic Geochemistry and from 1993 to 2001 I was a full board member and Membership Officer of the European Association of Organic Geochemists. I am also a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, a past Chair and committee member of the Royal Society of Chemistry (Peninsula Section) and a member of the Association of Chemistry and the Environment.

I was a member of the international judging panel of the Kuwait Science prize ($1,000,000) in December 2002.

In 2005 I was awarded a Blaustein Fellowship by the School of Earth Sciences at Stanford University, California, USA. I also visited the University of Calgary in August 2005 supported by a Royal Society Short Term Visit Award.

In 2007 I gave the opening plenary lecture at the 23rd International Meeting on Organic Geochemistry in Torquay, U.K. (audience 550) and was invited to deliver a plenary lecture at the 2008 International Meeting of Australian Association of Organic Geochemists in Adelaide, Australia and again in 2016. I have been a consultant to oilfield specialists Oil Plus Ltd, Newbury, U.K., on naphthenic acid chemistry and to the U.K. Foreign & Commonwealth Office on forensic oil identification methods (2007-2008) and counter proliferation efforts (April 2016). I was a member of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Peer Review College, NERC Life Sciences Mass Spectrometry Committee and NERC Services Review Group and of the Science Foundation Ireland Geosciences Review Panel. I won the "Making Plymouth Great" Business Ideas Challenge in 2007 and an ERC €2M Advanced Investigators Grant in 2009. The Biogeochemistry Research Centre, of which I am co-Director won the Vice-Chancellor's award for Best Research Team in 2011.


Teaching and Learning

Since the University was, until 2011, the National Centre for teaching in Environmental Sciences (https://www.gees.ac.uk), it is perhaps unsurprising that much of my teaching covered aspects of environmental organic chemistry. Other areas included analytical and biological organic chemistry for both undergraduate and postgraduate courses (BSc (Hons) Chemistry, Centre for Chemical Sciences; BSc (Hons) Environmental Science; MSc Applied Marine Science). In addition, I was involved in the production of new teaching material which focused on the use of computer-aided learning (CAL).

In 2007 I authored a successful appeal to HEFCE for an award to the Centre for Chemical Sciences of £256,000 funds for the promotion of undergraduate chemistry at the University of Plymouth. I also prepared teaching material for the "Chemistry for Our Future" initiative administered by the Royal Society of Chemistry.


Publications

My refereed publications since 1996 are listed below (reverse chronological) and my 'My Citations' page from Google Scholar provides additional bibliographic metrics:

In Press, Submitted or In Preparation

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

1999

  • Glegg, G.A., Hickman, L. and Rowland, S.J. (1999) Contamination of limpets (Patella vulgata) following the Sea Empress oil spill. Marine Pollution Bulletin 38, 119-125.
  • Johns, L., Wraige, E.J., Belt, S.T., Lewis, C.A., Massé, G., Robert, J.-M. and Rowland, S.J. (1999) Identification of a C25 highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) diene in Antarctic sediments, sea-ice diatoms and cultured diatoms. Organic Geochemistry 30, 1471-1475.
  • Rowland, S.J., Belt, S.T., Johns, L., Wraige, E.J., Lewis, C.A., Robert, J.-M. Massé, G., König, W., Frampton, D., Blackburn, S., Revill, A.T. and Volkman, J.K. (1999) Controls on the sedimentary distributions of the highly branched isoprenoid lipids of diatomaceous algae. 19th International Meeting on Organic Geochemistry, Istanbul, Turkey, 6-10 September 1999, Abstracts Part 1, 04B, Tubitak Marmara Research Center, 17-18.
  • Stutt, E., Pan, G., Sturt, H., McCormack, P., Herzl, V., Millward, G. and Rowland, S.J. (1999) Fate of oil production chemicals in seawater: Reactivity of organic constituents in produced waters. 19th International Meeting on Organic Geochemistry, Istanbul, Turkey, 6-10 September 1999, Abstracts Part 1, PB55, Tubitak Marmara Research Center, 431-432.
  • Wraige, E.J., Johns, L., Belt, S.T., Massé, G., Robert, J.-M. and Rowland, S. (1999) Highly branched C25 isoprenoids in axenic cultures of Haslea ostrearia. Phytochemistry 51, 69-73. [doi: 10.1016/S0031-9422(98)00694-3].
  • Zhou, J.L., Fileman, T.W., Evans, S., Donkin, P., Readman, J.W., Mantoura, R.F.C. and Rowland, S. (1999) The partition of fluoranthene and pyrene between suspended particles and dissolved phase in the Humber Estuary: a study of the controlling factors. Science of the Total Environment 243/244, 305-321.
  • 1998

    1997

    1996


    Studentships

    Dates Student Funding Body Award
    and
    Date
    Present
    Employment
    Title
    2014-2017 W.J. Robson Plymouth University In progress
    -
    The polar constituents of petroleum
    With Dr C.A. Lewis and Dr P.A. Sutton
    2012-2015 M.J. Wilde European Research Council and Plymouth University PhD
    2016
    Department of Chemistry, University of Leicester, U.K.
    On the bicyclic acids of petroleum [abstract]
    With Dr C.A. Lewis
    2011-2012 A.E. Ringrose NERC MPhil
    2013
    School Teacher
    Temporal and vertical distributions of IP25 and other lipid biomarkers in sea ice from Resolute By, Nunavut, Canada [abstract]
    With Dr S.T. Belt (Director of Studies) and Dr T.A. Brown
    2009-2012 D.E.A. Jones University of Plymouth PhD
    2013
    Plymouth International College, Plymouth, U.K.
    Synthesis, fractionation, characterisation and toxicity of naphthenic acids from complex mixtures [abstract]
    With Dr C.A. Lewis
    2008-2011 N. Tettmar-Downes NERC CASE with PML PhD
    2012
    The Environment Agency, Exeter, U.K.
    Chemical toxins from algal blooms
    With Dr Carole Llewellyn (Director of Studies)
    2006-2009 R. Johnson NERC CASE with Oil Plus Ltd. PhD
    2011
    Oil Plus Ltd., U.K.
    Biodegradation of aromatic naphthenic acids
    With Dr Corinne Whitby, University of Essex
    2005-2007 A. Scarlett HEIF2 in association with the Maritime and Coastguard Agency PhD
    2008
    Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia
    Effect-directed studies into the chronic toxicity of unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) of hydrocarbons from biodegraded crude oils [abstract]
    With Professor Tamara Galloway (School of Biosciences, University of Exeter).
    2004-2007 M. Frenzel NERC CASE Studentship/Schlumberger Research (Cambridge) PhD
    2008
    Oil Plus Ltd., U.K.
    Persistence, bioremediation and fate of unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) of hydrocarbons in the environment [abstract]
    With Professor Hilary Lappin-Scott (EMERGE, University of Exeter).
    2003-2006 C.H. Redshaw BBSRC CASE Studentship/Astrazeneca Brixham Environmental Laboratory PhD
    2007
    -
    The transport and fate of fluoxetine hydrochloride, diazepam and their human metabolites in sewage sludge-amended soil [abstract]
    With Dr M.F. Fitzsimons and Dr G.P Matthews
    2003-2006 C.E. West University of Plymouth Scholarship/Astrazeneca Brixham Environmental Laboratory PhD
    2007
    Saudi Aramco
    The photodegradation of diazepam and its human metabolites in water [abstract]
    With Dr C.A. Lewis
    2002-2005 P. Curtis-Jackson NERC Studentship PhD
    2006
    Quotient Bioresearch, U.K.
    Characterisation of algal derived organic nitrogen [abstract]
    With Dr Mark Fitzsimons (Director of Studies)
    2002-2005 B.E. Smith University of Plymouth Studentship PhD
    2006
    bp, U.K.
    Naphthenic acids: Synthesis, characterisation and factors influencing environmental fate [abstract]
    With Dr C.A. Lewis
    2000-2003 A.M. Booth NERC Studentship PhD
    2004
    SINTEF Petroleum Research, Norway
    Biodegradation, water solubility and characterisation studies of unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) of aromatic hydrocarbons [abstract]
    With Dr C.A. Lewis (Director of Studies)
    2000-2003 G.G. Massé University of Plymouth Studentship PhD
    2003
    Université Laval, Québec, Canada
    Biological controls on the production of cytostatic lipids of diatoms [abstract]
    With Dr S.T. Belt (Director of Studies)
    1998-2001 W.G. Allard University of Plymouth Studentship PhD
    2002
    -
    Sources and structures of commonly occurring highly branched isoprenoid alkenes [abstract]
    With Dr S.T. Belt (Director of Studies)
    1998-2001 P. McCormack University of Plymouth Studentship/AstraZeneca Environmental Laboratory PhD
    2003
    Plymouth University, U.K.
    The separation and identification of small highly polar or ionisable organic molecules in water [abstract]
    With Dr P. Jones (Director of Studies)
    1997-1999 S.J. Niven Environment Agency/Zeneca plc PhD
    2000
    University of Guelph, Canada
    The origins and occurrence of estrogenic A-ring aromatic steroids in U.K. sewage treatment works effluents [abstract]
    With Professor M. Depledge
    1996-1999 L.A. MacDonald University of Plymouth Studentship/National Grid Co. plc PhD
    2000
    Golder Associates, Australia
    Sub-surface migration of an oil pollutant into aquifers [abstract]
    With Dr G.P. Matthews (Director of Studies)
    1996-1999 E.L. Smith University of Plymouth Studentship/CASE with PML PhD
    2002
    University of the West Indies, Cave Hill, Barbados
    Unresolved complex mixtures of aromatic hydrocarbons in the marine environment: Toxicity, solubility and photodegradation studies [abstract]
    With Dr P. Donkin
    1995-1998 L.A. Johns University of Plymouth Studentship PhD
    1999
    -
    Structural characterisation and the diagenetic pathways of C25 highly branched isoprenoid hydrocarbons [abstract]
    With Dr S.T. Belt (Director of Studies)
    1995-1998 P.A. Sutton University of Plymouth Studentship/NERC PhD
    2000
    Plymouth University, U.K.
    The quantitative isolation of 'insoluble organic matter' (IOM) from sediments and bacteria, and its attempted dissolution using the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride-aluminium (III) chloride [abstract]
    With Dr C.A. Lewis
    1994-2000
    (part-time)
    T.W. Fileman PML MPhil
    2000
    Plymouth Marine Laboratory, U.K.
    The transport and fate of organic contaminants in estuarine and coastal systems [abstract]
    With Professor R.F.C. Mantoura (PML)
    1994-1997 H.F. Sturt SERC Case PhD
    2001
    Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, U.S.A.
    Molecular characterisation of fluidised catalytic cracker feedstocks using ruthenium tetroxide oxidation: A study of model hydrocarbons [abstract]
    With Dr C.A. Lewis
    1993-1996 M.C. Cooper University of Plymouth Studentship PhD
    1999
    University of Nottingham, U.K.
    Laminated sediments at Loch Ness: Indicators of Holocene environmental change [abstract]
    With Dr P.E. O'Sullivan (Director of Studies)
    1993-1996 E.J. Wraige NERC Case Studentship PhD
    1997
    Environment Agency, U.K.
    Studies of the synthesis, environmental occurrence and toxicity of unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) of hydrocarbons [abstract]
    With Dr P. Donkin (PML)
    1992-1999
    (part-time)
    M.J Hetheridge AstraZeneca PhD
    2001
    AstraZeneca, Brixham Environmental Laboratories, Brixham, U.K.
    An evaluation of the environmental fate of reactive dyes [abstract]
    With Dr B.J. Harland (AstraZeneca)
    1991-1999
    (part-time)
    A.O. Tyler B.M.T. Ceemaid PhD
    1999
    British Maritime Technology (Information Systems) Ltd., U.K.
    The distribution and reactivity of organochlorines in estuaries [abstract]
    With Professor G.E. Millward (Director of Studies)


    Research Income

    Income since 1996:

    Dates Funding Body and Project Amount
    2015-2019 NERC
    Distinguishing realistic environmental risks of nanoplastics by investigating fate and toxicology in real-world scenarios
    (with Professor R.C. Thompson)
    £354,890
    2015- Research Council of Norway (Forskningsrådet)
    HAVKYST: Assessment of long-term effects of oil exposure on early life stages of Atlantic Haddock
    (Share of PhD studentship - Lisbet Sorensen)
    £1,000,000
    £24,000 for PU
    2015- Research Council of Norway (Forskningsrådet)
    RESOLVE: Comprehensive chemical characterization of the unresolved petrogenic components of produced water
    (Share of postdoc - To be appointed)
    £699,000
    £52,000 for PU
    2010-2014 EU Initial Training Network
    Arctic and subarctic
    (with Professor S.T. Belt and Dr G. Massé)
    €429,435
    2011-2014 DEFRA
    Can micropollutants cause harm in the marine environment?
    (with Professor R.C. Thompson and Professor T. Galloway)
    £391,000
    2009-2014 ERC
    OUTREACH: Unresolved pollutants
    €2,000,000
    2009-2011 Oil Company Consortium
    Naphthenic acids
    £250,000
    2008 NERC
    Isotopic signatures of Arctic sea-ice biomarkers
    (with Professor S.T. Belt (PI) and Dr G. Massé)
    £39,040
    (in-kind funding)
    2007-2010 FCO
    Analysis of crude oils
    (with Dr C.A. Lewis)
    £300,000
    2007-2009 Weatherford SLS, Knowledge Transfer Partnership
    GC Tracer
    (with Dr C.A. Lewis)
    £193,268
    2007-2008 NERC
    Climate change in the Holocene: A multi-proxy case study
    (with Professor S.T. Belt and Dr G. Massé)
    £38,671
    2006-2007 NERC
    A novel proxy for Arctic sea ice
    (with Professor S.T. Belt and Dr G. Massé)
    £14,136
    (in-kind funding)
    2006-2007 Royal Society
    A novel proxy for determining palaeo-temperatures of Arctic sea waters
    (with Dr G. Massé (PI) and Professor S.T. Belt)
    £9,204
    2005-2006 MCA/DEFRA/DTI/MMS
    Potential ecological effects of chemically-dispersed and biodegraded oils
    £63,000
    2005 Stanford University
    Blaustein Fellowship, Visiting Scholar Stanford University, California, USA
    US$5,000
    2005 Norwegian Research Council
    Impacts of unresolved complex mixtures in the environment
    (with SINTEF, Trondheim, Norway)
    NOK1,000,000
    100,000 for UoP
    2004 The Leverhulme Trust
    Unravelling extremely complex toxic mixtures
    (exchange grant with Professor P. Nesterenko, Moscow State University)
    £11,200
    2004 NERC
    Profiling hydrocarbon humps
    (with Dr A.C Lewis, University of York)
    £171,187
    2004 NIES/Japan Society Promotion of Science Japan
    Isotopic study of persistent biogenic organics in Atlantic and Pacific Ocean sediments
    £5,500
    2004 NERC
    Dynamic aspects of terpenoid biosynthesis in diatoms (in-kind funding)
    £5,250
    2003-2006 Astrazeneca
    Fate of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (2 awards)
    £15,500
    2003-2005 NERC
    Diversity of novel, technologically useful, pigment-producing diatoms in estuaries of South Devon, U.K.
    £24,340
    2003 The Leverhulme Trust
    Lost at sea: Where do all the plastics go?
    (with Dr R.C. Thompson and Dr T. Galloway)
    £181,610
    2003 NERC
    Hydrocarbon humps
    £3,600
    2002-2004 MCA/DEFRA/DTI/MMS
    Potential ecological effects of chemically-dispersed and biodegraded oils
    £257,000
    2002-2004 NERC
    MIMOS: Towards a sea-truthing of environmental discharge models
    £68,347
    2001 Strategic Research Infrastucture Fund (SRIF) HEFCE
    Compound specific isotope ratio mass spectrometer and associated equipment
    £200,000
    2001 NERC
    Controls on diatom HBI distributions (in-kind funding)
    £3,600
    2000-2003 NERC
    Hydrocarbon humps
    £150,400
    2000-2001 Environment Agency
    Organic micropollutants in the River Thames (2 grants)
    £34,500
    1999-2002 Department of Environment, Transport & Regions
    Characterisation of bioaccumulated and unidentified agent(s) causing reduced scope for growth in mussels (Mytilus edulis)
    £186,800
    1999-2000 University of Plymouth, SCIL
    Production of computer aided learning software
    £2,750
    1997-1999 NERC (MIME) and oil industry
    Impact of marine industrial chemicals
    £245,000
    1997-1999 NERC (MIME)
    Micropollutant hydrocarbons in West of Shetland sediments (SWAMP)
    £51,000
    1997-1999 HEFCE SEED
    Production of computer aided learning software
    £4,000
    1997-1998 Environment Agency
    Oestrogenic chemicals in sewage treatment effluents: formation and occurrence
    £50,000
    1997-1998 MAFF
    Mass spectral studies of volatile pollutants in foodstuffs
    £39,000
    1997-1998 Zeneca
    Oestrogenic steroids: aromatisation of cholesterol
    £30,000
    1997-1998 Royal Society Travel Grant
    9 month sabbatical to CSIRO, Hobart, Australia
    £1,000
    1997-1998 British Council Travel Grant
    9 month sabbatical to CSIRO, Hobart, Australia
    £800
    1996-1997 NERC LOIS
    Advanced Mass Spectrometry Facility
    £60,000
    1995-1998 NERC ROPA
    Highly branched isoprenoid hydrocarbons as environmental indicators
    £82,000
    1994-1997 NERC LOIS
    Micropollutants in Humber Estuary
    £47,000


    Media Interest

    News articles since 2007:


    International & National Conference and Meeting Presentations

    Conference presentations since 1996:

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    2012

    2011

    2010

    2009

    2008

    2007

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    1997



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